“Black Lives Matter” is Mantra

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We can only begin to deeply practice Yoga if we have the capacity to feel safe, even if for a moment.  The historical impact of white supremacy has traumatized millions of people, denying them safety in many ways, and in this moment we are seeing the direct impact of this theft on Black communities across the world through the lens of police brutality against Black bodies.  I stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movements, Black sisters and brothers, and with all of those looking to dismantle white supremacy in all forms.

The vision of SafeSpacesYoga is to acknowledge that modern industry of Yoga is one of privilege that has profited by exclusion; my goal is to reclaim these practice in the landscape of inclusivity.

It is my goal to create, as much as possible, a sense of safety for each person who comes to me – all bodies, all abilities, and all gender expressions and sexualities are welcome.  I do not teach ‘Yoga’, I teach people how to apply Yoga techniques to support their individual lives, and as a result, help each person find their unique expression of the ancient lineage of Yoga.

‘Black Lives Matter’ is Mantra

Mantra is the science of bringing meaning into the deepest spaces of our hearts as a source of deep personal transformation.  If you pay attention to the flow of life, you may see mantra arising like a mirror to show you yourself more clearly.  At this moment, “Black Lives Matter” is one such mantra – what does it offer us in this moment?  As my dear friend Dr. M. recently wrote:

“Try “Black Lives Matter” as mantra japa 108 times and see what arises. If it becomes painful for you then know that you are  beginning to share the pain of many. As Howard Thurman suggests do not run from the emotion but meet it head on until you can manage it.”
We can only move forward together.
In this vein, SafeSpafesYoga will be amplifying the voice of a friend and colleague who will go by the name Dr. M., to protect her privacy.
Dr. M. is a dedicated spiritual practitioner, poet, writer, and a recently retired medical doctor.  She is exploring, using the written word, the expression of her journey as a black woman in the United States at this time.